Educators are invited to join the Holocaust & Humanity Center for a five-day institute that will give them effective and engaging techniques for teaching the Holocaust in their classrooms.

The course was quite literally jam packed with information, phenomenal speakers, and comprehensive coverage of this difficult and complex subject.
-Rebecca Holzman, Educator & 2021 Institute Graduate

For almost thirty years the Roma & Sam Kaltman Institute on Teaching the Holocaust has trained educators to teach the Holocaust effectively; helping their students be the best of humanity today. Whether you have a day, a week, a month or an entire semester, this institute can help you with practical classroom-based strategies for teaching this complex history. At this week-long workshop, you will:

  • Learn how teaching the Holocaust helps your students develop empathy and make personal connections to history.
  • Individualize the history by incorporating the testimonies of local Holocaust survivors with ready-to-implement activities.
  • Explore curricular strategies for both ELA and social studies classrooms that connects historical content with the vital literacy skills students need to succeed.
  • Join a network of Holocaust educators who, along with HHC staff, will support your work in the classroom for years to come.

Workshop Details:

REGISTER IN ADVANCE

Roma & Sam Kaltman, Holocaust survivors who made Cincinnati their home, devoted their lives to educating teachers about the Holocaust and we honor their memory with this annual workshop.

For more information, please contact Jodi Elowitz, Director of Education & Engagement, at: JELOWITZ@CINCYHHC.ORG.

The Roma & Sam Kaltman Institute on Teaching the Holocaust is made possible through funding provided by the Claims Conference.

Sami Steigmann survived the hate and horrors of the Holocaust but hasn’t let those experiences define him. Hear his story from the cruel Nazi medical experiments to the newly-formed Israeli Air Force to a lifetime of advocacy for Holocaust education.

Presented in partnership with the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center.

This event is free but registration is required.

Hon. Irwin Cotler, Special Envoy on Preserving Holocaust Remembrance and Combating Antisemitism, Government of Canada
Moderated by Felice Gaer, AJC Director, Jacob Blaustein Institute for the Advancement of Human Rights
2:00 p.m. Eastern, 1:00 p.m. Central,
12:00 p.m. Mountain, 11:00 a.m. Pacific

Wednesday, January 26, 2022 | 7:00 PM | Holocaust & Humanity Center

On the eve of International Holocaust Remembrance Day, survivor Eva Schloss will share her powerful story live in Reakirt Auditorium to commemorate the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center’s third anniversary at Union Terminal.

Born Eva Geiringer in Vienna, Austria, Eva and her family fled to the Netherlands after Germany annexed Austria in 1938. They were neighbors of Anne Frank’s family during their time in Amsterdam. After the Nazis occupied the Netherlands, Eva and her family went into hiding. The family was later betrayed and sent to Westerbork Concentration Camp and then to Auschwitz II-Birkenau.

After the war, Eva and her mother moved back to Amsterdam and reconnected with Otto Frank, whom her mother married — making Eva Anne Frank’s posthumous stepsister.

Learn more about Eva’s story during this intimate conversation with her on January 26. HHC will also unveil Eva’s virtual intelligence testimony in our newest exhibit, Dimensions in Testimony. Using specialized recording and display technologies and next-generation natural language processing, DIMENSIONS IN TESTIMONY, allows visitors to ask two-dimensional displays of Holocaust survivors questions and receive responses in real time.

This free event is hosted in partnership with Cincinnati Museum Center.

Registration required. Visit website for details.

Join us for an exclusive educator event with Holocaust survivor Eva Schloss, the posthumous stepsister of Anne Frank. 

At this event, educators will experience:

  1. V.I.P. ACCESS: Take a behind-the-scenes look at the museum’s VIRTUAL INTELLIGENCE EXHIBIT, featuring Eva Schloss. After previewing the exhibit, educators are invited to hear Eva share her powerful story live in Reakirt Auditorium at Union Terminal.
  2. COMMUNITY BUILDING: Engage with fellow educators prior to the event, with appetizers and drinks.
  3. CLASSROOM RESOURCES: Leave with curricular resources that showcase the power of survivor testimony in the classroom. All resources are designed to be easily implemented into existing curriculum.

Up to 3 Contact Hours Available.

Register on the event website.

The Holocaust Speaker Series, held each Wednesday at 11:00 am, features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. Join us on Wednesday, December 1 at 11:00 am via Zoom with Cheryl Hecht.

Cheryl tells the story of her father, David Hochstein, a Holocaust survivor from Cologne, Germany. Rescued by a Kindertransport, he was taken to London when he was 15. The Kindertransport movement was unique in that people of many religions came together to rescue 10,000 mostly Jewish children, bringing them to Great Britain. David’s story is one example of a teenager’s resilience, perseverance, and strength, during the Holocaust. Cheryl has worked as a professional and volunteer in the Jewish community. A graphic designer, she recently retired from the Mayerson JCC after 19 years.

Register in advance at this link.

Holocaust & Humanity Center 21st Anniversary Celebration
Sunday, October 3, 2021 | 5:30 PM

Save the date to celebrate the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center’s 21st birthday! On October 3, 2021, join us for a festive gathering marking HHC’s birthday and highlighting the critical work HHC does in the community. We will bring our community back together and thank supporters like you who have been with us on this journey. You made this moment possible.

Join us at historic Union Terminal for a festive night filled with activities including:

  • Cocktails and hors d’oeuvres
  • Live music
  • Photo booth
  • Video Toast Booth – submit your well wishes or share a memory of HHC
  • NEW! Browse the traveling Upstander exhibit display
  • Take a tour of the Holocaust & Humanity Museum
  • NEW! Explore HHC’s newest virtual intelligence exhibit, Dimensions in Testimony

Mark your calendars now! More information coming soon.

The Holocaust Speaker Series, held each Wednesday at 11:00 am, features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. Join us on Wednesday, September 22 at 11:00 am via Zoom with Matt Yosafat.

Matt Yosafat was born in Katerini, Greece, in 1936. In 1942, he went into hiding with the Nazi occupation of Greece. The Yosafats hid in places including a cave and tobacco shelter, rarely safe and often separated. Ultimately, the Yosafat family reunited in Katerini and were liberated, but the outbreak of a civil war led the family to emigrate to the United States in 1951. In 1955, Matt met his wife, Anneliese — who had arrived in the United States with her family shortly after the war — and they were soon married in 1959.

The Holocaust Speaker Series, held each Wednesday at 11:00 am, features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. Join us on Wednesday, September 15 at 11:00 am via Zoom with Roni Berenson.

The Holocaust Speaker Series, held each Wednesday at 11:00 am, features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. Join us on Wednesday, September 1 at 11:00 am via Zoom with Mark Heiman.

Mark tells the story of his family, originally from Demmelsdorf, a small farming community in Bavaria. Mark’s grandfather, Karl, served in the German army in WWI. He later moved to Munich where he established a textile business and raised a family. Mark’s father, Paul, was 12 years old when he witnessed his Jewish school being burned down the day after Kristallnacht. Arrested on Kristallnacht, Karl was interned in Dachau concentration camp. After 30 days, Karl left Dachau and was given 48 hours to leave Germany. The journey took the family to Switzerland, France, England, and finally to Cincinnati where they settled and thrived. Mark also discusses events leading to the Holocaust and its relevance today.