Register HERE.

Tammy Bennett and Priya Klocek will lead a discussion based in part on the AMS discussion guide prepared by former JCRC intern Aaron Torop

Register HERE.

The Holocaust Speaker Series, held each Wednesday at 11:00 am, features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. Join us on Wednesday, June 29 at 11:00 am via Zoom with Andrea Herzig. 

Andrea Angell Herzig is a retired educator and author of “Courage in the Little Suitcase.” The novel, written for middle grades, is historical fiction that centers on her distant relative, Mordechai Anielewicz, leader of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. At 20 years old, Anielewicz led 300 to 500 young men and women between the ages of 13 and 30 to fight back against the Nazis during the liquidation of the Warsaw Ghetto. Andrea shares this heroic, but tragic story, and also inspires audiences to stand up for what is just and morally right. Andrea lives in Cincinnati, Ohio, where she is an active volunteer, including as a speaker and interpreter for the Holocaust and Humanity Center.

Register HERE.

The Holocaust Speaker Series, held each Wednesday at 11:00 am, features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. Join us on Wednesday, June 22 at 11:00 am via Zoom with Cheryl Hecht.

Cheryl Hecht tells the story of her father, David Hochstein, a Holocaust survivor from Cologne, Germany. Rescued by a Kindertransport, he was taken to London when he was 15. The Kindertransport movement was unique in that people of many religions came together to rescue 10,000 mostly Jewish children, bringing them to Great Britain. David’s story is one example of a teenager’s resilience, perseverance, and strength, during the Holocaust. Cheryl has worked as a professional and volunteer in the Jewish community. A graphic designer, she recently retired from the Mayerson JCC after 19 years.

Register HERE.

Educators are invited to join the Holocaust & Humanity Center for a five-day institute that will give them effective and engaging techniques for teaching the Holocaust in their classrooms.

The course was quite literally jam packed with information, phenomenal speakers, and comprehensive coverage of this difficult and complex subject.
-Rebecca Holzman, Educator & 2021 Institute Graduate

For almost thirty years the Roma & Sam Kaltman Institute on Teaching the Holocaust has trained educators to teach the Holocaust effectively; helping their students be the best of humanity today. Whether you have a day, a week, a month or an entire semester, this institute can help you with practical classroom-based strategies for teaching this complex history. At this week-long workshop, you will:

  • Learn how teaching the Holocaust helps your students develop empathy and make personal connections to history.
  • Individualize the history by incorporating the testimonies of local Holocaust survivors with ready-to-implement activities.
  • Explore curricular strategies for both ELA and social studies classrooms that connects historical content with the vital literacy skills students need to succeed.
  • Join a network of Holocaust educators who, along with HHC staff, will support your work in the classroom for years to come.

Workshop Details:

REGISTER IN ADVANCE

Roma & Sam Kaltman, Holocaust survivors who made Cincinnati their home, devoted their lives to educating teachers about the Holocaust and we honor their memory with this annual workshop.

For more information, please contact Jodi Elowitz, Director of Education & Engagement, at: JELOWITZ@CINCYHHC.ORG.

The Roma & Sam Kaltman Institute on Teaching the Holocaust is made possible through funding provided by the Claims Conference.

The Holocaust Speaker Series, held each Wednesday at 11:00 am, features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. Join us on Wednesday, June 15 at 11:00 am via Zoom with Conrad Weiner.

Conrad was born in Storojinetz, a small town in Bucovina, once part of Romania (currently part of the Ukraine) in 1938. After a brief occupation of the region by the Soviet Army in 1941, Romanian authorities in alliance with German forces, started a massive campaign of annihilation and deportation of Jews to Transnistria. They were taken by cattle car, a journey of two days and one night, and then forced to walk for two weeks in snow and mud to the forced labor camp, Budi. Conrad was 3 1/2 years old at the time. While in Budi, Conrad fell very ill. Many of the prisoners advised his mother to give up. Her response was that a mother does not give up on her child. Eventually, he was nursed back to health by his mother. In 1944, at the age of six, Conrad and the 300 surviving prisoners at Budi were liberated by the advancing Soviet Army and repatriated to Romania. In 1946, Romania became a Communist country. It wasn’t until July 1960 that the paperwork was approved and Conrad’s family was able to come to America. He settled in Cincinnati and graduated from Indiana University with a B.A. in German and Russian Language and Literature. In 1968, he obtained a M.B.A. from the University of Cincinnati on a full-ride scholarship.

Register HERE.

We’re excited to welcome acclaimed writer Dr. Ibram X. Kendi to the Freedom Center as part of the Mercantile Library’s Harriet Beecher Stowe Freedom Writer series. Dr. Kendi is a leading scholar and voice on antiracism, earning accolades for his books Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in AmericaHow to Be an Antiracist and Antiracist Baby.

Dr. Kendi will be in conversation with Professor Emily Houh to discuss his work and his research, the state of equity and the scourge of racism in America and advice for advocates seeking to make the country a place where all can be free.

The Harriet Beecher Stowe Freedom Writer Award series, begun in 2003, honors Stowe, who spoke at the Mercantile Library in 1873. Dr. Kendi received the Harriet Beecher Stowe Freedom Writer Award in 2020 because of his commitment to “writing to change the world.”

Signed copies of Dr. Kendi’s books will be available for purchase.

Tickets are $15 each and available now.

The Holocaust Speaker Series, held each Wednesday at 11:00 am, features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. Join us on Wednesday, June 8 at 11:00 am via Zoom with Mark Heiman.

Mark tells the story of his family, originally from Demmelsdorf, a small farming community in Bavaria. Mark’s grandfather, Karl, served in the German army in WWI. He later moved to Munich where he established a textile business and raised a family. Mark’s father, Paul, was 12 years old when he witnessed his Jewish school being burned down the day after Kristallnacht. Arrested on Kristallnacht, Karl was interned in Dachau concentration camp. After 30 days, Karl left Dachau and was given 48 hours to leave Germany. The journey took the family to Switzerland, France, England, and finally to Cincinnati where they settled and thrived. Mark also discusses events leading to the Holocaust and its relevance today.

Register HERE.

The Holocaust Speaker Series, held each Wednesday at 11:00 am, features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. Join us on Wednesday, June 1 at 11:00 am via Zoom with Joyce Kamen.

Joyce, a semi-retired creative communications professional, conducted video interviews of nearly 40 of Cincinnati’s Holocaust survivors for the “Project Eternity” series, commissioned in the 1990s by Cincinnati’s Combined Generations of the Holocaust. In 1995, her Emmy award-winning documentary, “Because They Were Jews: Cincinnati Survivors of the Holocaust Remember”, was syndicated by PBS. Joyce tells the remarkable story of the extraordinary personal journey that she and her husband Fred have experienced since discovering in 2013 that Fred, who was adopted at birth, was the biological son of two Holocaust survivors. His mother Anna—then only 19—was living in Nazi-occupied Berlin when the war broke out. She was saved by a courageous Egyptian doctor. For over two years—and at great risk to his own life— Dr. Mohammed Helmy contrived an elaborate series of schemes to keep Anna from being deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau.

Register HERE.

WorldOregon presents the 2022 International Speaker Series: Intersections

Celebrating its 22nd season, WorldOregon’s International Speaker Series puts you virtually in the room with the global leaders, visionaries, and inspiring voices that are changing our world.  This year’s series, presented exclusively online, brings to WorldOregon audiences four of the globe’s brightest, boldest thinkers and advocates discussing race and social justice, sovereign rights, confronting aggression, and resilience and humanity in the face of crisis.

May 10, 7:30 PM (PDT)

Rebecca Nagle 
Nations within a Nation: Tribal Sovereignty 101

Activist-Writer and Citizen of the Cherokee Nation
Twitter: @rebeccanagle

The 2022 International Speaker Series will be streamed live online | Note: all times are PDT*

* Ticket-purchasers will receive a password-protected link following the online event to view or re-watch the program within a limited, 2-day window.