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Faith and Fashion: The Crowns of African American Women


  • National Undergroung Railroad Freedom Center 50 East Freedom Way Cincinnati, OH, 45202 United States (map)

Faith and Fashion: The Crowns of African American Women Open at National Underground Railroad Freedom Center Next Month


CINCINNATI, OH (January 30, 2017) Faith and Fashion: The Crowns of African American Women, a pop-up exhibit, will go on display February 21, 2017. , on display February 21 – April 1, 2017, highlights the various self-expressions of women of all ages celebrating African American church culture. Church services are a time of worship and praise. Often times in African American churches, in addition to hearing songs and sermons, observers cannot help but look in amazement at the various hats of its female parishioners. In addition to exploring the various colors of crowns, personal narratives will account for the historical celebration of how African American women broke away from their domestic uniforms for Sunday services.
 

Black History Month Pop-Up Exhibits & Programming Announcement

The museum will also host three special Black History Month programs; Paul Laurence Dunbar: Beyond the MaskTwice the First Time: A Discussion with Napoleon Maddox, and the Delta Gamma Lambda Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.'s 11th Annual African American History Quiz Bowl.
  
Paul Laurence Dunbar: Beyond the Mask is a full length documentary that explores the life and legacy of Paul Laurence Dunbar, one of the first African Americans to achieve national fame as a writer. Born to former slaves in Dayton, Ohio, Paul Laurence Dunbar is best remembered for his poem, We Wear the Mask and for lines from Sympathy that became the title of Maya Angelou’s autobiography, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. Dunbar’s story is also the story of the African American experience around the turn of the century. Frederick Lewis, School of Media Arts and Studies Associate Professor at Ohio University, and the documentary’s writer and director, will be in attendance to introduce the film and lead a post-screening discussion. This February 11 program, scheduled for 11:00 a.m., is free and open to the public. RSVPs are requested.
 
Twice the First Time: A Discussion with Napoleon Maddox explores the life and significance of Millie and Christine McCoy, enslaved Siamese twins. Freed after the war, the twins embarked on three major tours and were seen by "the crowned heads" of Europe. Millie and Christine appeared in forty-six states and traveled widely around the world, often in conjunction with P. T. Barnum's circus. This February 21 program, scheduled for 6:30 p.m., is free and open to the public. RSVPs are requested.
 
The Delta Gamma Lambda Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.'s 11th Annual African American History Quiz Bowl offers the region's youth an opportunity to celebrate the achievements of African Americans over the history of our country. Young people from schools, churches, and community groups are encouraged to join the annual tournament. Please contact Steven Clark at (513) 746-8596 or smcaphia@aol.com for more information.
 
For more information about exhibits and programming at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, visit freedomcenter.org.