Awaited Shows
Dec
1
to Dec 23

Awaited Shows

Awaited is a creative retelling of the Christmas story.

It’s a story full of risk, rejection and unexpected rescue by a long-awaited King. It is the story of how God relentlessly pursues each of us with his love and freedom, no matter who we are, what we’ve lived through or where we’ve come from. It is a story that has the power to change us all. 

Produced and hosted by Crossroads in Oakley and Mason, Awaited runs from December 1 to December 23.Awaited is one of Cincinnati’s top Christmas experiences, with over 90,000 people attending last year’s shows.

 

PERFORMANCES

OAKLEY (30 SHOWS)

FRI, DEC 1: 7PM
MON, DEC 4: 7PM
TUE, DEC 5: 7PM
WED, DEC 6: 7PM
THUR, DEC 7: 7PM
FRI, DEC 8: 7PM
SAT, DEC 9: 1, 4 & 7PM
SUN, DEC 10: 1, 4 & 7PM
MON, DEC 11: 7PM
TUE, DEC 12: 7PM
THUR, DEC 14: 7PM
FRI, DEC 15: 7PM
SAT, DEC 16: 1, 4 & 7PM
SUN, DEC 17: 1, 4 & 7PM
MON, DEC 18: 7PM
TUE, DEC 19: 7PM
WED, DEC 20: 7PM
THUR, DEC 21: 7PM
FRI, DEC 22: 5 & 8PM
SAT, DEC 23: 4 & 7PM

MASON (17 SHOWS)

FRI, DEC 15: 5 & 8PM
SAT, DEC 16: 1, 4 & 7PM
SUN, DEC 17: 1, 4 & 7PM
MON, DEC 18: 7PM
TUE, DEC 19: 7PM
WED, DEC 20: 7PM
THUR, DEC 21: 7PM
FRI, DEC 22: 5 & 8PM
SAT, DEC 23: 1, 4 & 7PM

FREE TICKETS AVAILABLE

Read more at http://www.awaitedshow.com

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Chanukah- Festival of Lights
Dec
12
to Dec 20

Chanukah- Festival of Lights

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Chanukah is the Jewish eight-day, wintertime “festival of lights,” celebrated with a nightly menorah lighting, special prayers and fried foods. 

The Hebrew word Chanukah means “dedication,” and is thus named because it celebrates the rededication of the Holy Temple(as you’ll read below). Also spelled Hanukkah (or variations of that spelling), the Hebrew word is actually pronounced with a guttural, “kh” sound, kha-nu-kah, not tcha-new-kah.

What Chanukah Commemorates

In the second century BCE, the Holy Land was ruled by the Seleucids (Syrian-Greeks), who tried to force the people of Israelto accept Greek culture and beliefs instead of mitzvah observance and belief in G‑d. Against all odds, a small band of faithful Jews, led by Judah the Maccabee, defeated one of the mightiest armies on earth, drove the Greeks from the land, reclaimed the Holy Temple in Jerusalem and rededicated it to the service of G‑d.

When they sought to light the Temple's Menorah (the seven-branched candelabrum), they found only a single cruse of olive oil that had escaped contamination by the Greeks. Miraculously, they lit the menorah and the one-day supply of oil lasted for eight days, until new oil could be prepared under conditions of ritual purity.

To commemorate and publicize these miracles, the sages instituted the festival of Chanukah. 

Read the full story of Chanukah.

How Chanukah Is Observed

At the heart of the festival is the nightly menorah lighting. The menorah holds nine flames, one of which is the shamash(“attendant”), which is used to kindle the other eight lights. On the first night, we light just one flame. On the second night, an additional flame is lit. By the eighth night of Chanukah, all eight lights are kindled.

Special blessings are recited, often to a traditional melody, before the menorah is lit, and traditional songs are sung afterward.

A menorah is lit in every household (or even by each individual within the household) and placed in a doorway or window. The menorah is also lit in synagogues and other public places. In recent years, thousands of jumbo menorahs have cropped up in front of city halls and legislative buildings, and in malls and parks all over the world. 

We recite the special Hallel prayer daily, and add V’Al HaNissim in our daily prayers and in the Grace After Meals, to offer praise and thanksgiving to G‑d for “delivering the strong into the hands of the weak, the many into the hands of the few ... the wicked into the hands of the righteous.”

Read the full menorah-lighting guide.

Learn what to expect at a public menorah lighting.

When Is Chanukah?

Chanukah begins on the eve of Kislev 25 and continues for eight days. On the civil calendar, it generally coincides with the month of December.

View (and print) a Chanukah calendar.

Chanukah Foods

Since the Chanukah miracle involved oil, it is customary to eat foods fried in oil. The Eastern-European classic is the potato latke(pancake) garnished with applesauce or sour cream, and the reigning Israeli favorite is the jelly-filled sufganya (doughnut). 

Find the perfect Chanukah recipe.

Dreidel: the Chanukah Game

On Chanukah, it is customary to play with a “dreidel” (a four-sided spinning top bearing the Hebrew letters, nungimmelhei and shin, an acronym for nes gadol hayah sham, “a great miracle happened there”). The game is usually played for a pot of coins, nuts, or other stuff, which is won or lost based on which letter the dreidel lands when it is spun.

Chanukah Gelt

In today’s consumer-driven society, people tend to place great importance on giving Chanukah gifts. However, the tradition is actually to give Chanukah gelt, gifts of money, to children. In addition to rewarding positive behavior and devotion to Torahstudy, the cash gifts give the children the opportunity to give tzedakah (charity). This has also spawned the phenomenon of foil-covered “chocolate gelt.”

Why we give gelt.

What It Means For You

Noting that one should spend time in close proximity to the Chanukah lights, the Previous Rebbe would say, “We must listen carefully to what the candles are saying.” So what are the flickering flames telling us? Here are some messages:

a. Never be afraid to stand up for what’s right. Judah Maccabee and his band faced daunting odds, but that didn’t stop them. With a prayer on their lips and faith in their heart, they entered the battle of their lives—and won. We can do the same.

b. Always increase in matters of goodness and Torah-observance. Sure, a single flame was good enough for yesterday, but today needs to be even better.

c. A little light goes a long way. The Chanukah candles are lit when dusk is falling. Perched in the doorway, they serve as a beacon for the darkening streets. No matter how dark it is outside, a candle of G‑dly goodness can transform the darkness itself into light.

d. Take it to the streets. Chanukah is unique in that its primary mitzvah is observed in public. It’s not enough to be a Jew at heart, or even at home. Chanukah teaches us to shine outwards into our surroundings with the G‑dly glow of mitzvahs.

e. Don't be ashamed to perform mitzvahs, even if you will feel different. Rather, be like a menorah, proudly proclaiming its radiant uniqueness for all to see.

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Christmas  Holiday
Dec
25
to Jan 5

Christmas Holiday

Christmas

Christmas is marked on the 25 December (7 January for Orthodox Christians).

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Christmas is a Christian holy day that marks the birth of Jesus, the son of God.

The story of Christmas

Jesus' birth, known as the nativity, is described in the New Testament of the Bible.

The Gospels of Matthew and Luke give different accounts. It is from them that the nativity story is pieced together.

Both accounts tell us that Jesus was born to a woman called Mary who was engaged to Joseph, a carpenter. The Gospels state that Mary was a virgin when she became pregnant.

In Luke's account Mary was visited by an angel who brought the message that she would give birth to God's son. According to Matthew's account, Joseph was visited by an angel who persuaded him to marry Mary rather than send her away or expose her pregnancy.

Matthew tells us about some wise men who followed a star that led them to Jesus' birthplace and presented him with gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh. Luke tells how shepherds were led to Bethlehem by an angel.

According to tradition, Joseph and Mary travelled to Bethlehem shortly before Jesus' birth. Joseph had been ordered to take part in a census in his home town of Bethlehem.

All Jewish people had to be counted so the Roman Emperor could determine how much money to collect from them in tax. Those who had moved away from their family homes, like Joseph, had to return to have their names entered in the Roman records.

Joseph and Mary set off on the long, arduous 90-mile journey from Nazareth along the valley of the River Jordan, past Jerusalem to Bethlehem. Mary travelled on a donkey to conserve her energy for the birth.

But when they arrived in Bethlehem the local inn was already full with people returning for the census. The innkeeper let them stay in the rock cave below his house which was used as a stable for his animals.

It was here, next to the noise and filth of the animals, that Mary gave birth to her son and laid him in a manger.

Modern celebration

Advent

Advent is the period of preparation for the celebration of the birth of Jesus and begins on Sunday nearest to 30th November. The word Advent comes from the Latin adventus meaning coming. Traditionally it is a penitential season but is no longer kept with the strictness of Lent and Christians are no longer required to fast.

Advent wreaths are popular especially in churches. They are made with fir branches and four candles. A candle is lit each Sunday during Advent.

Christmas Day is the Christian festival most celebrated by non-churchgoers, and churches are often completely full for the service late on Christmas Eve.

Father Christmas

An important part of today's Christmas is the myth of Father Christmas (called Santa Claus in America). His origins are in Christian and European tradition. But the visual image of Father Christmas that we have today is the one popularised by American card-makers in the Victorian era.

Traditionally, Father Christmas visits houses at midnight on Christmas Eve, coming down the chimney to leave presents. Children hang up stockings - nowadays usually large socks with Christmas patterns knitted into them - for Father Christmas to fill with little toys and presents ('stocking fillers').

Some traditions surrounding Father Christmas pre-date Christianity. His sleigh, pulled by reindeer, is left over from Scandinavian mythology. The practice of leaving mince pies and a glass of milk or brandy for him on Christmas Eve may be a remnant of Pagan sacrifices made to mark the end of winter and the coming of spring.

The USA has the figure of Santa Claus, whose name comes from Saint Nicholas via the Dutch Sinterklaas. Saint Nicholas of Myra (a location in modern-day Turkey) is, among other things, the patron saint of sailors. A famous story has him anonymously delivering bags of gold coins to a man who could not afford dowry for his daughters to get married. Some versions of this story even have Saint Nick dropping the bags down the chimney.

In modern times the figures of Father Christmas and Santa Claus are indistinguishable.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/christianity/holydays/christmas_1.shtml

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Kwanzaa Holiday Dec 26-Jan 1
Dec
26
to Jan 1

Kwanzaa Holiday Dec 26-Jan 1

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Kwanzaa is an annual celebration of African heritage that is celebrated for a full week by many African-Americans living in the U.S. and abroad. The holiday was the first to ever celebrate Black history and is named after the Swahili phrase that describes the first fruits gathered during the harvest season.

When Is Kwanzaa?

Kwanzaa is celebrated from December 26 to January 1 every year. Many people who celebrate Kwanzaa also celebrate Christmas and combine traditions from both holidays into the winter holiday season.

History of Kwanzaa

Maulana Karenga, a professor of African studies, came up with the idea for Kwanzaa back in 1966 during the height of the civil rights movement in the United States. His goal was to create a holiday that would allow African-Americans to pay tribute to their roots and to bring some of the traditions and values of cultures from the African continent to everyday living.

Originally, Kwanzaa was considered a part of counterculture, but has become more mainstream in recent years. The holiday is not an official holiday in the United States; however, because it coincides with the Christmas season, some people may have days off from work during the celebration.

How Kwanzaa Is Celebrated

The key tradition of the annual observance of Kwanzaa is the lighting of a symbolic candelabra called the kinara that holds three red candles, three green candles and one black candle. Families light one candle each night to remind them of an important value from African culture. The candles are:

  • Umoja. This candle symbolizes the value of unity and is a reminder to try and exist peacefully with family and within one’s community.
  • Kujichagulia. This candle is a reminder of self-determination or identity and is meant to encourage people to be themselves and be proud of who they are.
  • Ujima. This candle represents collective work or collaborating with neighbors and family members to find answers to problems and do good works.
  • Ujamaa. This candle is a reminder of cooperative economics or helping other members of the community prosper by doing business with one another.
  • Nia. This candle symbolizes the idea of living with the purpose of helping to elevate the African-American community and fight for equality.
  • Kuumba. This candle represents creativity, the goal of beautifying a community and leaving the world in a better state for the next generation.
  • Imani. This candle symbolizes the importance of maintaining faith when faced with struggles and oppression.

In homes where Kwanzaa is celebrated, the kinara is placed on a mat known as a mkeka. A number of items are placed around it, including:

  • Corn and crops to symbolize the harvest
  • A cup called the ikombe cha Umoja that honors one’s African ancestors
  • Gifts called Zawadi for friends and family

Many families create elaborate displays that also include flags that represent their African roots and African works of art and handicrafts. Often, each night is marked with a special meal. Communities may stage productions of African dance, host African poetry readings or showcase African art during Kwanzaa.

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Save the Dates! Xavier's Institute of Spirituality - Spring Courses
Dec
31
12:00 AM00:00

Save the Dates! Xavier's Institute of Spirituality - Spring Courses

Xavier's Institute of Spirituality - Spring Courses

THEO 524 Journey Through Christianity II ; Kristine Suna-Koro          

 01/08-05/04 Tuesdays- 6:00 pm-8:30 pm     

THEO 536 Black and Feminist Theology ; Adam L. Clark (P)

            03/04-05/04 Thursdays 05:30 pm-09:15 pm            

THEO 547 Ethics For a Planetary Crisis ; Marcus C. Mescher (P)

            01/08-05/04 Wednesdays- 6:00 pm-08:30 pm             

All Courses can be taken as 3- Credit hour or non-credit workshop.     

For more information see website https://www.xavier.edu/issj/about.cfm

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Mass in Celebration of the 51st World Day of Peace
Jan
1
10:00 AM10:00

Mass in Celebration of the 51st World Day of Peace

Mass in Celebration of the 51st World Day of Peace

Cincinnati:  Cathedral of St. Peter in Chains

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(Corner of 8th and Plum Streets, Downtown Cincinnati)

11:00 a.m. Celebrated by Archbishop Dennis Schnurr

A reception with light refreshments will follow the Mass at the Cathedral.

  

Dayton:  Ascension Parish

(2025 Woodman Drive, Kettering)

10:00 a.m. Celebrated by Bishop Joseph Binzer

 The Holy Father designates each New Year's Day as a special opportunity for the universal Church to pray for a year of greater peace, respect for life and social justice.  This year's theme is "Migrants and refugees:  men and women in search of peace."  Join us a we pray for all those fleeing their homelands from war and hunger, discrimination, persecution, poverty and environmental degradation.  We will pray too for the resolve to not view migrants as a threat but as an opportunity to build peace.

Click here for event flier.

Sponsored by the Archdiocesan Offices of Catholic Social Action, Worship and Mission.For more information, contact the Catholic Social Action Office at (513) 421-3131, ext. 2660 or csa@catholiccincinnati.org in Cincinnati; (937) 224-3026 or plong@catholiccincinnati.org in Dayton.

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Breathe Free Film Screening & Crossing Borders Art Exhibit
Jan
10
to Jan 11

Breathe Free Film Screening & Crossing Borders Art Exhibit

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Breathe Free Film Screening

CET Studios, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Wednesday, January 10, 2018

1223 Central Parkway, Cincinnati, OH  45214-2812

Parking at the Town Center Garage if $5 (exact change is required)

 Columbus Crossing Borders Art Exhibit

Xavier University Art Gallery at the A.B. Cohen Center

4:00 - 7:00 p.m.

Thursday, January 11, 2018

1658 Musketeer Drive, Cincinnati, OH  45207 (Free Parking)

The Columbus Crossing Borders film "Breathe Free" is a moving documentary that shares the stories of refugees and the artists inspired by those stories.  Through the lens of filmmaker Doug Swift, we encounter those who fled war, violence and persecution.  We witness the unease and fear surrounding U.S. border issues.  And we learn how this leads to 34 artists producing a project based on forced migration.  The Columbus Crossing Borders art exhibit opens  at 10:00 a.m. the next day.  Reception starts at 4:00 p.m. and more film screenings.

Click here for event flier.

RSVP for the exhibit at https://columbuscrossingborders.eventbrite.com 

and the free screening at https://breathefree.eventbrite.com 

 Presented by Catholic Charities Southwestern Ohio, CET-Think TV, Xavier University Department of Art, Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati and the Ursulines of Cincinnati in partnership with the Archdiocese of Cincinnati Social Action Office, Bellarmine Chapel, Immaculate Heart of Mary, Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati - Rahma Community Services, St. Anthony Church (Madisonville) and Xavier University Center for interfaith Community Engagement.

 

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Violins of Hope
Jan
23
6:00 PM18:00

Violins of Hope

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Violins of Hope

We wanted you to be the first to know about Violins of Hope.  Mark your calendar for Tuesday, January 23rd for a performance showcasing Holocaust-era violins, featuring Cincinnati's finest musicians. These violins witnessed the worst of humanity in ghettos and concentration camps, but serve as a symbol of hope and resistance. On January 23rd we will have a morning concert specifically designed for students and a community concert in the evening. Look for our public announcement in early November for more on these special violins, the concert, the diverse community partnerships, additional programming, and how to purchase tickets.

Art & Writing Showcase: We are also inviting middle and high school students to participate in an art and essay showcase in reflection of hope. Using materials of your choice, middle school (grades 6-8) and high school (grades 9-12) students are asked to create an original piece of art or compose an essay which reflects on the theme of hope, as it relates to the story of Holocaust survivor and Cincinnatian, Henry Meyer (bio included). Students can submit their entries to HHC by Friday, January 5th by 4pm. In recognition of your creativity, a selection of art and essays will be chosen and displayed during our Violins of Hope concert on January 23rd. Click here for showcase information.

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Save the Date! Refresh Your Soul Conference on Positive Aging
Mar
12
9:00 AM09:00

Save the Date! Refresh Your Soul Conference on Positive Aging

Refresh Your Soul Conference on Positive Aging

Registration is Open!

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March 12, 2018 at 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Doors open at 8 a.m. for continental breakfast & exhibitors

Cintas Center at Xavier University

Online registration parishhealthministry.com/rys.

Keynote Speaker:  Dr. Gary Chapman, bestselling author of The 5 Love Languages. Sold over 10 million copies and translated into 50 languages.

Keynote presentations include The 5 Love Languages and Positive Aging and Forgiveness and Healthy Aging (based on his bestselling book, The 5 Languages of an Apology).

Other Featured Speakers:  Kay Van Norman, President, Brilliant Aging and 

Dr. Wendy Rogers, expert in Technology for Healthy Aging and Liz Tassone, Healthy Aging expert and spiritual director.

Optional VIP Speaker Luncheons include:  

  • Liz Tassone, Gerontologist and spiritual retreat leader presenting on
    Aging with Spirit
  • Dr. Gary Chapman - Keeping Love Alive as Memories Fade - The 5 Love Languages of Dementia
  • Kay Van Norman - Vitality Portfolio - How to age with vitality and purpose!

For information on volunteering at the conference, contact Mary Ellyn Pusz at mpusz@erslife.org.

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Mourning the Creation of Racial Categories
Dec
9
1:00 PM13:00

Mourning the Creation of Racial Categories

  • National Underground Railroad Freedom Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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Saturday, December 9, 2017
1:00 p.m.
National Underground Railroad Freedom Center
50 East Freedom Way
Cincinnati, OH 45202

Mourning the Creation of Racial Categories is a feature documentary that explores how racial categories were created in the United States and their lasting consequences. The film follows sociologist Joan Ferrante's efforts to find unique ways of mourning the biological, family, romantic, and other bonds severed by this legally imposed system. Ferrante issued a call to students majoring in the creative and performing arts at Northern Kentucky University to become part of a creative team dedicated to realizing her vision. The film, narrated by the students, gives special attention to the laws enacted between 17th century Virginia and the Jim Crow era that made these categories matter. It features student choreography, music, sculpture, visual art, dramatic reenactments, poetry and spoken word pieces- all created with the aim of moving audiences to take notice and mourn how Americans were divided into categories we call races.

See More at National Underground Freedom Center website.

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Latin America Trending towards Beijing, Washington, or its Southern Star
Dec
5
5:30 PM17:30

Latin America Trending towards Beijing, Washington, or its Southern Star

  • Schiff Confrence Room- Cintas -Xavier University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

"Latin America Trending towards Beijing, Washington, or its Southern Star"

Cynthia Watson, Ph.D.

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Professor of Strategy at the National War College

Please join the FPLC, Greater Cincinnati World Affairs Council, and the Brueggeman Center, in an exciting presentation by Cynthia Watson on December 5 – details below. Guests are welcome for this timely discussion.   

Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 5:30-6:15 p.m.-Reception

6:15 p.m. Dinner - 7:00-8:30 p.m. -Presentation and Discussion

Schiff Conference Center, Cintas Center at Xavier University

1624 Herald Avenue, Cincinnati OH  45207

See below for directions and parking instructions.

According to Dr. Cynthia Watson "Latin America is much in the news because a number of leaders are under scrutiny for corruption, the Chinese are involved in a manner they have never been historically, and the United States is absorbed in issues elsewhere.  The region is showing some evidence of achieving the conditions the U.S. has long hoped for--absorbing the rule of law, calling its international relationships to adhere to standards, and trying to create a genuinely Latin American path towards sustained development.” 

Please join us to find out what is really going on in Latin America today.

Cynthia Watson grew up in Thailand and Colombia.  She earned a M.A. in Economic History/Latin American Studies from the London School of Economics and a PhD in Government & International Studies from Notre Dame. She was 2011 Alumna of the Year at University of Missouri at Kansas City.  Author of nine books on security issues, including Combatant Commands: Origins, Structure and Engagements (2011), Stability, Security, Reconstruction and Transition Operations (2012), and Military Education (2007), she focuses on military education as an instrument of statecraft as well as China’s modernizing and its effect on security relations, having worked on China in Latin America for the past fifteen years.  Her most recent manuscript is Asia First: Reflecting or Refracting Strategy?, assessing the use of strategy to achieve the rebalance to Asia and the future of the United States around the world. 

Dr. Watson joined the National War College faculty in 1992.  She was Assistant Dean for Social Sciences at Loyola University of Chicago where she also taught Political Science.  Dr. Watson worked for the House Subcommittee on Government Information & Individual Rights as well as the U.S. General Accounting Office.   She is a member of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations and the International Institute for Strategic Studies.

Reserve dinner for yourself and your guests - go to www.fplcohio.org  Dinner is $30 for members* and $40 for non-members. “Events” page is where you can pay by PayPal or Credit Card.  If unable to use PayPal, RSVP to Cynthia Cummins at fplcohio@gmail.com  (513 745-3922) and pay at the door.
*Members include:
  FPLC, Brueggeman Center, and GCWAC.                                                  

Temporary Reserved Parking Permit

Valid:  December 5, 2017

CARD MUST BE DISPLAYED ON PASSENGER SIDE OF DASHBOARD

Please note that directions and a map to our facility can be obtained at our XU website, www.xavier.edu/cintas/directions or you may call 513-745-3222 to receive recorded directions.

Flyer Attachement

 

 

 

                                                                                                               

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10,000 Letters For Dreamers!
Nov
30
to Dec 11

10,000 Letters For Dreamers!

10,000 LETTERS FOR DREAMERS!

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Share the Journey

#sharejourney

Archbishop Dennis Schnurr highlights Holy See's "Share the Journey" campaign and expresses solidarity with local migrants.

The Archdiocese of Cincinnati is joining with the other Roman Catholic dioceses in the State of Ohio on a campaign to generate 10,000 letters to our congressional delegates across the state, urging them to support the DREAM Act or similar legislation to provide a path to regularize the status of immigrants brought to the United States when they were very young.

The effort is part of a two-year, worldwide "Share the Journey" campaign to be launched by Pope Francis on September 27, inviting all to share the difficult journey of migrants and refugees through prayer and support. Click here to learn more.

The Archdiocese will collect letters between now and December 18, International Migrants Day. "I would like to take this opportunity to reiterate our solidarity with migrants and refugees in our Archdiocese," said the Most Reverend Dennis M. Schnurr, Archbishop of Cincinnati.

"The Church stands with these brothers and sisters of ours who have journeyed great distances to find life, security, and hope for the future in our own communities.  Not only that, but we walk beside them, listening to their stories, helping bear their loads, and celebrating the gifts of culture and faith they bring to us.  Through them, we are reminded of who we really are: pilgrims on a journey from this life to a greater Kingdom."

The Archdiocese and related ministries have planned a number of "share the journey": programs over the next two months. These programs " will provide us with an opportunity to encounter our fellow travelers in our communities, appreciate their hopes and struggles, and advocate for their dignity," Archbishop Schnurr noted.  These efforts include:

  • Multi-lingual Mass with migrants and refugees on September 27 at 7 p.m. at St. Mary Catholic Church (310 Allen St., Dayton, OH 45410);
  • A presentation on the Catholic Church's teaching on migration, titled "Restoring Order and Human Dignity" on October 1 at 7 p.m. at St. Joseph Church (101 W. Pearl St., Wapakoneta OH 45895);
  • A presentation by Fr. Daniel Groody entitled "Passing Over: A Compassionate Response to Immigrants and Refugees" on October 5 at 7 p.m. (with a light dinner at 5:30pm) at St. Albert the Great Church (3033 Far Hills Ave., Kettering OH 45429).

In addition, ongoing opportunities for education and service to migrants and refugees exist through Catholic Charities Southwestern Ohio at (513) 241-7745 orhttps://ccswoh.org/   and Catholic Social Services of the Miami Valley at (937) 498-4593 or http://www.cssmv.org/ . For more information on any of these or other upcoming events, please contact our Catholic Social Action Office at (513) 421-3131, ext. 2660, or csa@catholiccincinnati.org.

CLICK HERE TO READ ARCHBISHOP SCHNURR'S FULL MESSAGE FOR "SHARE THE JOURNEY," SENT TO ALL PRIESTS AND DEACONS.

Have your parish or group conduct a letter-writing campaign to Congress! Here are the resources you need:

Thank you for all your support!

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Interfaith Prayer Vigil to End Capital Punishment
Nov
30
7:00 PM19:00

Interfaith Prayer Vigil to End Capital Punishment

  • St. Peter in Chains Cathedral - Synod Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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The Catholic Archdiocese of Cincinnati and the Intercommunity Justice and Peace Center will be holding an interfaith Prayer Vigil to pray for an end to the use of capital punishment in Ohio. The vigil will be held at Synod Hall, St. Peter in Chains Cathedral in downtown Cincinnati on Thursday, November 30, 7:00-8:00 p.m. There are currently 143 inmates on death row in Ohio. 

In 2015, Pope Francis stated, "Today capital punishment is unacceptable, however serious the condemned's crime may have been. It is an offense to the inviolability of life and to the dignity of the human person which contradicts God's plan for man and for society and for his merciful justice, and it fails to conform to any just purpose of punishment. It does not render justice to the victims, but rather foments revenge."

The Cathedral, along with thousands of other buildings and landmarks worldwide participating in the global "Cities for Life" campaign, will be illuminated the night of November 30 to raise awareness of the call to abolish capital punishment.

 

"By lighting up the Cathedral of St. Peter in Chains, the Archdiocese joins communities across the globe in calling for an end to the use of the death penalty," said the Most Reverend Dennis M. Schnurr, Archbishop of Cincinnati. "We will be praying with other local faith-based and community groups who agree that there is no moral or practical reason for our government to take another human life in order to establish justice and safety. We also recommit our outreach to victims' families and friends who have suffered from the terrible actions of offenders. Together, may we shine as a beacon of hope and healing against all violence."

People of all faiths are invited to participate in the Prayer Vigil. The entrance to Synod Hall is near the rear of the Cathedral, facing City Hall. Free parking will be available during vigil hours in the Cathedral parking lot.

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AJC's 17th Annual Thanksgiving Diversity Lunch
Nov
15
11:45 AM11:45

AJC's 17th Annual Thanksgiving Diversity Lunch

AJC Cincinnati 17th Annual Thanksgiving Diversity Lunch

Hope Keeping the Dream Alive

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Celebrating our unique roots & shared values AJC Cincinnati invites you to join local civic leaders, ethnic, religious and international communities for our 17th annual Thanksgiving Lunch

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

11:45am - 1:15pm

HONORING DACA RECIPIENTS: José Cabrera and Riccy Enriquez Perdomo

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, known as DACA, was created in 2012 by the Obama administration. DACA recipients, certain undocumented immigrants who entered the country illegally before their 16th birthday, were given protection from deportation and were granted eligibility for a work permit and driver’s license.

$20 per person. RSVP here.

For additional information, contact Naomi at 513.621.4020 or rubenn@ajc.org

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MUSE, Cincinnati Women's Choir - FREE Concert - Immigration Focus
Nov
9
7:30 PM19:30

MUSE, Cincinnati Women's Choir - FREE Concert - Immigration Focus

  • Bellarmine Chapel at Xavier University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Welcome! by MUSE Women's Choir

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Thursday 11/9 at 7:30 PM - 9 PM
Bellarmine Chapel - Xavier University

3801 Ledgewood Dr 

Cincinnati, OH 45207

Facebook event page is here.
MUSE, Cincinnati's Women's Choir, will perform a FREE concert revolving around the topic of Immigration. MUSE explores immigration through reconciling with the past, modern hospitality, and expansive patriotism.

Coming to this free concert will be a perfect chance for anyone auditioning on November 11th to hear MUSE perform.

This concert will be interpreted in ASL for the Deaf and Hard of hearing by Erin Kelley.

Audience Parking:

Free parking is available in the Cintas Center East Lot. Lot entrance is at the corner of Pacific Ave. & Musketeer Dr. From parking lot, walk west along Musketeer Dr. to Bellarmine Chapel – approximately a quarter of a mile. 

For those needing accessible parking, you may park along both sides of Musketeer Drive just east of Bellarmine Chapel. Please be cautious to not block building entrances or fire hydrants. Campus security is aware that cars will be parked on this street for the concert.

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Lunch and Learn with Dr. Al Miller - Small Acts that make a Difference
Nov
9
12:00 PM12:00

Lunch and Learn with Dr. Al Miller - Small Acts that make a Difference

  • Cincinnati and Hamilton County Public Library (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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Lunch and Learn with Dr. Al Miller - Small Acts that make a Difference

'Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass, was a pogrom against Jews throughout Nazi Germany, Austria and recently occupied areas of Czechoslovakia on November 9-10, 1938.  On that unforgettable night, Jewish homes, hospitals, and schools were ransacked, as the attackers demolished buildings with sledgehammers.  Over 1,000 synagogues were burned and over 7,000 Jewish businesses were destroyed or damaged.  When the evening was over, shards of broken glass littered the streets.

This year, on the 79th anniversary of the pogrom, we Remember Kristallnacht with a Lunch and Learn at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County.  Please bring a brown bag lunch and join us to hear Dr. Al Miller talk about his family's experiences during Kristallnacht. You can get a preview of his talk in the video above. The event will be held on Thursday, November 9 from Noon till 1:00 PM.  We will be meeting in the HuenefeldRoom at the downtown branch of the library, 800 Vine Street.  Parking is available in the Garfield Garage, 11 West 9th Street or at parking meters on the streets.

For more information or to RSVP for the event, please contact Lisa Shusterman at Lshusterman@holocaustandhumanity.org or 513-487-3055.

If time allows, please be sure to take some time to visit our exhibit, BESA: A CODE OF HONOR - a photographic exhibit of Muslim Albanians Who Rescued Jews During the Holocaust, in the lower level of the library.'

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Institute for Religious Liberty: Common Origins Interfaith Dialogue
Nov
8
7:00 PM19:00

Institute for Religious Liberty: Common Origins Interfaith Dialogue

  • Thomas More College - Steigerwald Hall Saints Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Common Origins Interfaith Dialogue

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On Wednesday evening, November 8, 2017,  the Institute for Religious Liberty will host three distinguished scholars for an Interfaith Dialogue featuring the three Abrahamic traditions: Catholic, Jewish, and Muslim, moderated by Dr. Catherine Sherron, Chairperson of the Philosophy Department at TMC. The speakers are:

  1. Dr. Jeffrey Zalar, who holds the Ruth J. and Robert A. Conway Endowed Chair of Catholic Studies at the University of Cincinnati.
  2. Dr. Jonathan Cohen, Dean and Associate Professor of Talmud and Halakhic Literature at Hebrew Union College.
  3. Dr. Waleed El-Ansary, University Chair of Islamic Studies, Institute for Spirituality and Social Justice at Xavier University.

Read more here..

Institute for Religious Liberty

Mission Statement

To advance the American concept of religious freedom as an inalienable right and the protection of this right for all people.

Beginnings of the Institute

The Thomas More College Institute for Religious Liberty was established by Thomas More College President David A. Armstrong, J.D. in 2015 after several local business and educational leaders, including representatives from Hebrew Union College, discussed the need to celebrate and educate others about the constitutional privilege and right to freely worship and practice religion. According to Thomas More College President David A. Armstrong: "There is no better place to advance and explore that inalienable right than here on our campus as we challenge our students of all faiths to examine the ultimate meaning of life, their place in the world, and their responsibility to others."

"Religious Freedom is part of the warp and woof of our nation," said Dr. Gary P. Zola, who represents Hebrew Union College on the Institute's Steering Committee. "In light of contemporary events that capture the headlines daily, it is difficult to identify a more salient and timely subject to explore in a forum of this sort."

Headed by Executive Director, Raymond G. Hebert, PhD, Dean of the College Emeritus, the Institute strives to accomplish its mission through education and dialogue in the form of academic symposia and lectures featuring internationally renowned speakers.

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Joint Prayer Service in Commemoration of the Reformation
Nov
5
7:00 PM19:00

Joint Prayer Service in Commemoration of the Reformation

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Joint Prayer Service in Commemoration of the Reformation

The Lutheran World Federation and The Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity have jointly developed a Common Prayer to mark the 500 years of the Reformation in 2017.  Last October, Pope Francis joined with Lutheran leaders in Lund, Sweden to share in this prayer of thanksgiving, repentance and commitment to common witness. The Archdiocese of Cincinnati and ELCA Southern Ohio Synod invite all to follow in their footsteps to mourn the division, share our joy in the Gospel and pray for greater unity in Jesus Christ.

Sunday, November 5, 2017  at 7:00pm

Epiphany Lutheran Church

(6430 Far Hills Ave., Centerville)

 Presiding: Bishop Joseph R. Binzer (Auxiliary Bishop, Archdiocese of Cincinnati) and Bishop Suzanne Darcy Dillahunt (Bishop, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Southern Ohio Synod)

Music by the Choirs of Epiphany Lutheran and St. Francis of Assisi Churches

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Main Library Holds Community Forum about Opioid Epidemic
Nov
4
2:00 PM14:00

Main Library Holds Community Forum about Opioid Epidemic

Main Library holds community forum about opioid epidemic

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Join us at for a panel discussion about the opioid epidemic affecting Greater Cincinnati. The event starts at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 4, at the Main Library in the Reading Garden Lounge. This event is for adults; no registration is required.

 

Panelists will include:

·      Capt. Mike Neville, Cincinnati Police Department

·      Chief Tom Synan, Newtown Police Department and the Hamilton County Heroin Coalition

·      Kevin Finn, Strategies to End Homelessness

·      Dr. Shawn Ryan, President and Chief Medical Officer of BrightView Health.

For more information, call 513-369-6900 or visit CincinnatiLibrary.org.

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Know Your Neighbor #IAMAMERICA
Nov
4
1:00 PM13:00

Know Your Neighbor #IAMAMERICA

  • Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Know Your Neighbor

Know Your Neighbor is a chance to visit the Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati to meet your Muslim American neighbors, show support and learn about Islam.

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To RSVP, email your name and # of guests to toursandtalks@cincinnatiislamiccenter.org

Upcoming Know Your Neighbor dates:

Saturday, November 4 @ 1:00 PM (RSVP by Nov 2)

Saturday, December 2  @ 1:00 PM (RSVP by Dec 1)

Saturday, January 6  @ 1:00 PM (RSVP by Jan 5)

Saturday, February 3  @ 1:00 PM (RSVP by Feb 2)

Saturday, March 3  @ 1:00 PM (RSVP by Mar 2)

If you would like to schedule a tour or have a speaker come to you outside of Know Your Neighbor, please fill out the Tour Request Form or Speaker Request Form.

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The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection
Nov
3
6:00 PM18:00

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection

  • National Underground Freedom Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join us on Friday, November 3

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Be one of the first to see The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection return to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center this November! Tickets for the opening reception on Friday, November 3, are $25.00 and are available for purchase at freedomcenter.org. The reception is free for National Underground Railroad Freedom Center members.

Bernard and Shirley Kinsey have a passion for African American history, art and culture and one of the largest private collections of African American art, artifacts and documents, spanning 400 years of history. Amassed during more than four decades of the Kinseys’ marriage, the collection features work by Romare Bearden, Elizabeth Catlett, Jacob Lawrence and Richard Mayhew alongside archival material related to Frederick Douglass, Zora Neale Hurston and Malcolm X. The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection is presented by Macy’s.



Bernard and Shirley Kinsey will discuss how they obtained some of the exhibit’s key pieces and answer questions guests may have about the artifacts, artwork and documents on display at the opening reception on Friday, November 3.

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection challenges and redefines African American identity and representation in history and the arts. Don't miss the opportunity to see this traveling exhibition on its only North American stop in 2017. Click the invitation below to purchase your tickets today!

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Clifton Cultural Arts Center - Crossing the Border Exhibit
Nov
3
6:00 PM18:00

Clifton Cultural Arts Center - Crossing the Border Exhibit

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Crossing the Border Exhibit: 

Oct 13th - Nov 3rd

After hearing months of political slogans about building a Wall on the US-Mexican Border to stop Mexican immigration and contraband, local photographer Jens G. Rosenkrantz, Jr set out on a 3,000 mile journey along the back roads and dirt trails of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California to document the landscape before the “big, beautiful wall” was built. He will be exhibiting 50 to 70 photos out of the 2,000 taken during his trip with observations and commentary on the sights and sounds along the way.

Mr. Rosenkrantz is a Cincinnati-based photographer who has exhibited at many local galleries, shows, and venues and his works are in several private and corporate collections. When he is not driving the back roads with his cameras and old maps, he is working on his current Cuban Art Exchange with his wife Kay Hurley, a local landscape painter.

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Besa: Code of Honor: Muslim Albanians Who Rescued Jews During the Holocaust
Nov
3
4:30 PM16:30

Besa: Code of Honor: Muslim Albanians Who Rescued Jews During the Holocaust

Besa: Code of Honor: Muslim Albanians Who Rescued Jews During the Holocaust

New Library exhibit shares story of hope in divided times

During a time when many are divided by their differences, the Library, Holocaust and Humanity Center and Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati seek to unite and transform conversation through a new exhibit: Besa: A Code of Honor, Muslim Albanians Who Rescued Jews During the Holocaust. This little-known story of hope will be on display Sept. 5–Nov. 13 at the Main Library.

Besa is an Albanian term which highlights the belief that when we work together, we can make an impact on our community. The exhibition is curated by Dr. Mordecai Paldiel and features photographs taken by the American photographer Norman Gershman. Together Paldiel and Gershman showcase personal rescue stories of Muslim-Albanian families who saved Jews during the Holocaust. The families featured in the exhibit were recognized as Righteous Among the Nations by Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center in Jerusalem. 

There will be a special workshop featuring Dr. Paldiel for educators 4:30-6:30 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 5. During the workshop, educators can learn how one small Muslim- Albanian community went out of their way to save Jewish lives during World War II, view the exhibit before its open to the public and earn two contract hour credits (three if also attending a public program).

Following the workshop, during an opening reception, Dr. Paldiel will speak about the significance of documenting the rescue of Jews by non-Jews during the Holocaust and the importance of honoring these rescuers as role models for outstanding human behavior. The opening reception will be held 7 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 5.

The workshop is free and open to all educators, however registration is required. Register online, call 513-487-3055 or e-mail Jodi Elowitz at jelowitz@holocaustandhumanity.org.    

Registration is not required for the exhibit or opening reception.

For details, visit CincinnatiLibrary.org or call 513-369-6900.

 

 

 

 

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What is Sustainability? A Philosophical Perspective
Oct
25
7:00 PM19:00

What is Sustainability? A Philosophical Perspective

  • Xavier University - Schmidt Hall Conaton Board Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

DIRECTIONS TO XAVIER UNIVERSITY

CONATON BOARD ROOM

SCHMIDT HALL

DRIVING INTERSTATE 71

 

TRAVELING SOUTH: I-71 South to the Dana Avenue exit, turn right on Dana (continue below)...

 

TRAVELING NORTH:  I-71 North to Dana Avenue exit, turn right on Duck Creek, right on Montgomery Road and left on Dana (continue below)...

 

...follow Dana until you see the University (on the right).  Enter the University at the guardhouse entrance which is University Drive (on your right).  Note:  If you get to Victory Parkway you have gone too far. 

 

DRIVING INTERSTATE 75

 

TRAVELING SOUTH:  I-75 South to Mitchell Avenue exit, turn left on Mitchell (continue below)...

TRAVELING NORTH:  I-75 North to Mitchell Avenue exit, turn right on Mitchell (continue below)...

  ...follow Mitchell until it ends; turn left onto Clinton Springs which turns into Dana Avenue.  Follow Dana until you see the University (on your left).  Cross Victory Parkway and turn left onto University Drive at the guardhouse entrance.  

 TO CONATON BOARD ROOM:

After entering at the guardhouse, there will be parking spaces located immediately past the guardhouse, on University Drive, and in lots just below University Drive.  Conaton Board Room is on the second floor of Schmidt Hall.  Schmidt Hall is the second building on University Drive.  The main entrance to Schmidt Hall is at the circular staircase. 

Once in the building, there are steps immediately to your left, or an elevator at the end of the hallway opposite the steps. 

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Jacob and Jennie L. Lichter Series in Judaic Studies
Oct
24
7:00 PM19:00

Jacob and Jennie L. Lichter Series in Judaic Studies

Jacob and Jennie L. Lecture Series in Judaic Studies

Three Amazing Lectures- multiple dates:

Tudor Parfitt President Isaac Navon Professor of Sephardi and Mizrahi Studies at Florida International University (FIU) Title: “Becoming Jewish in Sub-Saharan Africa”Date: 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 24, 2017Location: Mayerson JCC, 8485 Ridge Road, Cincinnati, OH 45236 (South of Ronald Reagan Hwy) 

Paula Fredriksen Aurelio Professor of Scripture emerita, Boston UniversityTitle: “Mediterranean Mixing: Jews in Pagan Places and Pagans (as well as Chrisitians) in Jewish Places”Date: 7:00 p.m. Monday, October 30, 2017 Location: Taft Center, 1 Edwards, UC Uptown Campus .

Yaakov Ariel Professor of Religious Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel HillTitle: “Christian Zionism in the United States” Date: 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, January 23, 2018Location: Taft Center, 1 Edwards, UC Uptown Campus

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Read more here.

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NAACP Freedom Fund Dinner
Oct
21
6:00 PM18:00

NAACP Freedom Fund Dinner

FOR THE 2017 FREEDOM FUND DINNER

JOIN THE CINCINNATI BRANCH NAACP

ON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2017

AT THE DUKE ENERGY CONVENTION CENTER

The event begins at 6 p.m. with a cash bar and networking followed by dinner at 7 p.m. Tickets are $75 per person.

Featured Speaker: Joe Madison "The Black Eagle"

Joe Madison will speak at approximately at 8:15 p.m. He is a recognized human rights activist and the pre-eminent African American radio, aka "The Black Eagle". His show's motto is "What are you going to do about it". He served as Executive Director of the Detroit NAACP at the age of 24. He was named Outstanding Media Personality at the 104th Annual NAACP Convention and has been selected as one of the Talker Magazine’s top 10 talk radio personalities for 10 consecutive years.

Tickets for the dinner may be purchased online at: cincinnatinaacp.com or by calling the office at (513) 281-1900. Tickets may be purchased online no later than Wednesday, October 18, 2017 or at office no later than Thursday, October 19, 2017.

The Cincinnati NAACP office

Attached is information about the Cincinnati NAACP Freedom Fund

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MARCC Community ID Event
Oct
21
12:00 PM12:00

MARCC Community ID Event

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MARCC Community Identification Card Event

The Metropolitan Area Religious Coalition of Cincinnati (MARCC) and Catholic Charities will be hosting a MARCC ID day on Saturday Oct 21st, 2017 at Woodward High School, 7005 Reading Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45237The Metropolitan Area Religious Coalition of Cincinnati (MARCC) community identification (ID) card will improve the potential for individuals to be recognized and provided with equal protection and due process under the law and receive governmental services in Cincinnati.  The MARCC ID card is for any resident who may have limited access to government issued forms of identification. 

What it is....Recognized as a valid form of identification within the city of Cincinnati by police officers and city agencies except where state and/or federal law requires another form of identification

What it is not... A replacement for a driver’s license or state ID card..A card that provides the right to vote in elections.

The MARCC ID card was created to support a safer, more inclusive and welcoming community. It’s distributed monthly by Catholic Charities Southwestern Ohio on behalf of MARCC. The cards may be renewed annually.

How to Get a MARCC ID Card:

Residents seeking to obtain the MARCC ID card need to provide the following information:

·      Photo identification such as an expired driver’s license, national ID card, passport, matricula consular or other embassy ID.

·      Proof of residency (utility bill, current rent agreement, medical record, bank statement) with current address.

·      $15.00 (cash).

Catholic Charities is hosting a MARCC ID day on Saturday, October 21st, 2017 at the Woodward High School, 7005 Reading Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45237. Applicants must attend a mandatory orientation at 12:00 p.m. or at 2:00 pm.

What to Expect:

1.              Listen to the mandatory orientation, where you will learn about the benefits and limitations of the MARCC ID card and then engage in valuable dialogue with law enforcement and other community partners. 

2.              Your existing photo identification and proof of residency will be reviewed and entered while your picture is taken.  Documents will be returned to you.

The MARCC ID card will be reviewed, printed and mailed to your current address within two weeks. 

READ MORE& Spanish Version

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Chasing Dreams: Baseball & Becoming American
Oct
19
7:00 PM19:00

Chasing Dreams: Baseball & Becoming American

Chasing Dreams: Baseball & Becoming American

About the Exhibition

There are people whose contributions to baseball history went far beyond mere batting averages or stolen bases. From Hank Greenberg and Sandy Koufax to Joe DiMaggio, Jackie Robinson, Roberto Clemente, Fernando Valenzuela, and Ichiro Suzuki, these are players who didn’t just play the game—they changed the game. For generations of American Jews and other minorities, they served as athletic, cultural, and ethical role models. Chasing Dreams: Baseball and Becoming American celebrated baseball and highlighted the role of baseball’s game changers—not only major league players but also vendors, team owners, minor leaguers, amateur players, scouts, broadcasters, journalists, novelists, and fans—who challenged the status-quo and inspired the nation. Read more..

Rounding Third and Heading for Home: CHASING 3000: A FILM SCREENING

Thursday, October 19, 2017 at 7:00 pm

Written and produced by Cincinnatian Bill Mikita, this heartwarming film is inspired by a true story about two brothers with a big dream to see Roberto Clemente get his 3000th hit. Bill will offer remarks before and after the screening, revealing the very personal connections he has to this story of two brothers, one dream, and the chase of a lifetime. Reservations recommended. Members: free Non-members: $5 in advance or at the door 513.487.3098

Register Today

Ninth Inning: CLOSING DAY

Sunday, October 22, 2017 from 1–5 pm

Say goodbye to the baseball season by taking a last look at Chasing Dreams: Baseball & Becoming American before it hits the road!

Read more..

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Clifton Cultural Arts Center - Refugees Welcome Potluck Dinner
Oct
19
6:00 PM18:00

Clifton Cultural Arts Center - Refugees Welcome Potluck Dinner

Clifton Culture Arts Center hosts: Refugees Welcome Potluck Dinner

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Come together with refugees and non-refugees to break bread and share stories: you’re invited to a FREE Potluck Community Dinner at CCAC on Thursday, October 19 from 6:00 – 8:00pm.

All Community Members Welcome

Please bring a dish to share if you are able.  Kindly RSVP to info@cliftonculturalarts.org or (513) 497-2860 by October 16.

Learn more about the Refugees Welcome ♥ to Dinner project.

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African Professionals Network (APNET) 7th Annual Symposium
Oct
14
5:30 PM17:30

African Professionals Network (APNET) 7th Annual Symposium

 APNET 7th Annual Symposium: Africa’s Stories: Music, Art, Culture, and Excellence.

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Saturday, October 14, 2017 from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. 

The American Red Cross, 2111 Dana Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45207

'The purpose of the Symposium is to foster relationships and promote appreciation of African immigrants, their culture, and the diverse array of talents they bring to Cincinnati. The Symposium is APNET’s largest professional event contributing towards enhancing the Tristate’s multicultural image of promoting diversity, social change, and inclusion.

The Symposium also offers a great opportunity to network with business leaders and other dynamic professionals in the region. Through storytelling, we believe we will create an excellent platform to share ideas, learn, and create long-term professional and business partnerships. Participants will have the opportunity to learn about some of the unique stories of Africa through music, art, and culture.

We are honored to have Dr. David Githuku, R&D Director at Procter & Gamble, as our keynote speaker for the event.

The success of this event depends largely on our partners, sponsors, and participants. Your support helps promote awareness, engagement, and promotion of diverse talent in our community. We further invite you to participate by sponsoring or collaborating with APNET.

For more information about event details, tickets, sponsorships, donations, please visit
www.symposium.africanprofessionalsnetwork.org, email info@africanprofessionalsnetwork.org, or call 513-658-1699.'

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